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Books below are by Vijay Mehta Chair of Uniting for Peace

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Vijay Mehta's Peace Beyond Borders Book Review by Jonathan Fryer

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Review by Jonathan Fryer, Jonathan Harold Fryer is a British writer, broadcaster, lecturer and Liberal Democrat politician

Despite what most Brexiteers believed, the European Union has been a great success as a peace project. That is the central thesis of veteran Indian peace and justice campaigner Vijay Mehta’s latest book, Peace beyond Borders (Catapult, £9.99), in which he argues that exporting the EU model to other parts of the world would help end conflicts. In fact, several other parts of the world have indeed been regionalising in recent decades, from South East Asia (ASEAN) to the Gulf Arab states (GCC) and South America (UNASUR). None has up till now gone as far in terms of economic let alone political integration as the EU, but they all acknowledge that they are stronger together.

The author looks at each continent or sub-continent in turn, seeing how cooperation has overcome divisions and historic rivalries, as well as championing the potential of further cooperation. This strengthening of a multipolar global reality is healthy, he believes, rather than the United States being the only super-power (as it became after the collapse of the Soviet Union), acting like some sort of world policeman. In a final section, Vijay Mehta acknowledges that there are nationalist forces resisting the sharing of sovereignty, just as within some countries (including the UK and Spain) there are forces that want more regional autonomy or even independence. Scotland, of course, may well re-examine the case for independence if Brexit is now successfully implemented, preferring to remain within the EU.

Reading this book one can only lament that just over half the voters of Britain did not understand the elements of peace and hope inherent in the European project. Had some been able to read it before they cast their vote on 23 June, maybe it would have changed their minds.

You can write to Vijay Mehta, Uniting for Peace, 14 Cavell Street, London E1 2HP, Telephone number: 0207 791 1717. To buy the book, send a cheque made payable to Vijay Mehta for £9.99 +£2.00 for the postage or buy online at www.europeforpeace.org.uk or Amazon.